Education and Public Curriculum

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The reality is that automation, not immigration, represents a far greater danger to many jobs we consider as employment in today’s era. Many types of labor-oriented jobs, such as factory work, will continue to be usurped by technology. With the advent of driverless vehicles, commercial transportation will become automated. Construction jobs will also be subject to change. A reconstruction of Wisconsin’s job market lies before us. How can society adapt? We must embrace the fields where humans are needed: art, music, nursing, care-taking, childcare, areas where empathy and concern are the qualifications; ones unfulfillable by robots.

Addressing the concerns of today and tomorrow should become part of our public school curriculum, one way to help our economy adapt and promote our survival. While science and engineering should maintain at the forefront, the changing direction of our economy allows for other subjects to permeate the public school curriculum: nursing, care-taking, insects (with an emphasis on pollination), waste, climate change, and agriculture. Labels can be rethought. Curriculum reform in a public school setting is one avenue to sustaining human survival, a way to rethink and approach gender-specific employment at a younger age where such a transformation could potentially have a greater success of taking hold in the long term. The educational issues at hand today are far from being addressed when solely defined by the broad line of being either public or private. Instead, the prudent question at this point is, “What do we need to know to survive tomorrow, and how can we ready our youth?”.

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